The summer reading list

Your summer reading list should contain a dozen of the best books about the holiday season, relaxation, the summer, warmth, sunlight, wine, evening and song.

Actually this is rubbish. Your summer reading list is whatever you want to read. However, it should not be measured in numbers (of books). This is for the amateur. Real lists are measured in years. It should never be an achievable list (also for the amateurs). It should have a life of its own, way beyond your control and way ahead of you in knowing what you need.

A reading list is a priceless document. It should remain intact, unconquered, and be passed on to your children.

The Reading Challenge

Read Wildly Reading Challenge.png

If I was to take part in a reading challenge, I would attempt this one. I made it because it pushes me to read way beyond my known borders. And while I thought I was a wide roaming reader of sorts, it turns out that I’m not. I have also not yet found titles for the whole list.

Reading across from the top right-hand corner:

  1. A manga title –
  2. History book by a woman writer – Islam: A Short History by Karen Armstrong
  3. Translated from Japanese –
  4. An Indian writer – The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy
  5. A Virago title – South Riding by Winifred Holtby
  6. Ancient Greek literature – The Birds by Aristophanes
  7. A New York Review Classic – The Invention of Morel by Aldopho Bioy Casares
  8. Beatrix Potter – The Tale of Jeremy Fisher
  9. Book 1 of a Science Fiction Series – Wool by Hugh Howey
  10. An Australian Indigenous writer – Carpentaria by Alexis Wright
  11. A children’s picture book -The Wonder Thing by Libby Hathorn
  12. Middle East Book Award –
  13. An epistolary novel –
  14. Short stories written by a woman – The Love of a Good Woman by Alice Munro
  15. A book written in the 1700s –
  16. A Science fiction classic – Dune by Frank Herbert
  17. A book that feature vampires – The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova
  18. A book over 1000 pages – Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace
  19. A banned book – Forever Amber by Kathleen Windsor (Banned in fourteen states in the US, and by Australia in 1945 as: a collection of bawdiness, amounting to sex obsession)
  20. An Australian play – Summer of the Seventeenth Doll by Ray Lawler
  21. A book of poetry, single poet – The Poetry of Pablo Neruda
  22. Any translated book into English – My Brilliant Friend by Elena Ferrante
  23. Any Shakespeare play – Othello
  24. A fantasy stand alone novel – The Princess Bride by William Goldman
  25. Fiction translated from Chinese – The Garlic Ballads by Mo Yan

 

 

The Imps of Reading

IMG_20160811_144540

I like to listen to the people that visit my bookshop. I like to hear what they read and to discover the strong and fabulous details of why and how.

A lady brings in her friend to show her the shop, the books, just everything. But her friend is not impressed. She has unfortunately read everything that is on her reading list and there is nothing new here. She is confident to condemn The Magic Pudding as ordinary and that it’s a pity that as a children’s book, it simply fails to deliver. The lady who brought her in agrees and looks sad. Then her friend announces a headache and says she must leave now.

There is a lady just outside the door on her phone; she is loudly telling her mother that she ought to read Hilary Mantel’s Wolf Hall.  Her mother must be objecting…. but she is told that she is going to read it regardless, as it has just been purchased for her birthday.  The lady urges her mother to realise that it is good to have new books added to her (faulty) reading list. Then they discuss eggs, and then an upcoming family event.

The lady puts her phone back in her pocket and comes back inside, she passes the lady who is suffering from headaches and they are two busy ships, passing in the night. The imps of reading lists will not let them rest.